Top 9 Most Common Citations During Child Care Inspections & How to Avoid Them

By Jackie Roberson, Jr., Director of Legally Exempt

  1. Immunization records not found on-site for each child
  2. Smoking conducted indoors
  3. No working carbon monoxide detector on-site
  4. Materials such as lighters, medications, detergents, aerosol cans, and various cleaning agents not stored in an inaccessible area which does not post a hazard to the children
  5. Evacuation drills not being conducted monthly
  6. Emergency telephone numbers not listed on-site
  7. Protective caps or covers not installed in all electrical outlets
  8. No working smoke detector on-site
  9. No portable/stocked first aid kid on-site

How to prevent health and safety citations found during inspections:

  • The providers must report all providers, volunteers, employees, and household members in the home where child care is taking place
  • The provider must inform the enrollment agency (CCRN’s Legally Exempt Department in Erie County) of any changes in the schedule of care
  • The provider must have a working carbon monoxide detector on-site
  • Materials such as lighters, medications, detergents, aerosol cans, and various cleaning agents must be stored in an inaccessible area which does not pose a hazard to the children, and if they are stored in an area which poses a hazard to children, they are locked with a locking device so that children cannot access the poisonous materials
  • Evacuation drills are conducted monthly
  • Emergency telephone numbers posted on-site
  • Protective caps installed in all electrical outlets throughout the house
  • Working smoke detectors on-site with new batteries
  • Portable/stocked first aid kit on-site • Copies of immunization records found on-site for each child
  • The location of care is free from smoke/all smoking conducted outdoors

What is Legally Exempt child care?

The term “Legally Exempt” child care refers to care provided by a provider who is exempt from child care licensing and registration regulations. Providers are caring for closely related children or no more than two non-related children in their own home, or are providing care in the child(ren)’s home. If a parent has a child care subsidy through the Erie County Department of Social Services (ECDSS), the legally exempt provider must be enrolled through DSS.

What is the responsibility of CCRN?

Child Care Resource Network (CCRN) is responsible for enrolling, re-enrolling, inspecting, and monitoring child care providers who care for children, under the age of 13, who receive day care subsidy from ECDSS. The agency enrolls over 1,300 child care providers per year. In order for a working parent to receive subsidized funding, parents must first apply with ECDSS to obtain a day care subsidy case. Once the working parent has obtained the daycare subsidy case, the parent would then choose a day care provider, and ECDSS will pay for the services rendered.

CCRN and ECDSS Day Care Unit work together to determine the eligibility for the payment of child care providers receiving subsidized payment from ECDSS. The income standards are used to determine eligibility and how fees for Non-Temporary Public Assistance Day Care Services are calculated.